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FracTracker Alliance Logo with Map

Seeking new Manager of Communications and Development – based in Pittsburgh or Harrisburg, PA

Job Announcement and Online Application:
Manager of Communications and Development, FracTracker Alliance

Job Description

PURPOSE: Manage all external communications activities of the organization; Cultivate and maintain strategic relationships with partner organizations and institutions; Promote and coordinate college internship program; Manage cyber security activities; In coordination with Executive Director, execute organizational fundraising activities including proposal development, prospect ID, annual giving campaigns, major gift solicitation, events planning, donor relations, and applicable database management.

DUTIES:

  • Oversee FracTracker website. Write/edit articles on key issues and findings related to oil and gas development concerns and coordinate maintenance of other content areas (photos, resources, projects, etc.)
  • Work with Manager of Data and Technology, other FracTracker staff, and consultants to evaluate and improve the aesthetics, features, and functionality of FracTracker’s website and related technology (e.g. phone app)
  • Oversee survey development regarding user feedback on the FracTracker website and related technologies (as needed)
  • Periodically update online and printed training tools for utilization of the website, web maps, and mobile app
  • Proactively engage news media on oil and gas issues and FracTracker’s work through interviews, calls, meetings, alerts, and other techniques. Serve as initial contact for major media inquiries
  • Work with Manager of Operations to maintain and update FracTracker exhibits, publications, and marketing materials (as needed)
  • Create and disseminate the organization’s annual report each spring
  • Develop timely FracTracker e-newsletters and communications with our constituencies (with support from Community Outreach and Communications Specialist). Oversee social media channels.
  • Manage implementation of the organization’s communications plan; regularly propose, integrate, and evaluate new communications strategies/ideas; and, help Executive Director assure staff compliance with communications response protocols
  • Supervise and inform activities of Community Outreach and Communications Specialist, who will strategically engage community partners and support communication activities of the organization
  • Periodically represent FracTracker at important conferences, meetings, and events regionally and nationally
  • As opportunities arise, author/co-author scientific papers and white papers elevating the work of FracTracker – translate FracTracker’s work into policy-relevant content
  • As opportunities arise, write articles for popular media on the work and successes of FracTracker
  • Manage FracTracker’s internship program by organizing and publicizing internship opportunities across the U.S.; overseeing hiring of the interns working with field staff and the Manager of Operations
  • Assess cyber threats and vulnerabilities to FracTracker’s website. Initiate and manage protocols to protect the website and staff devices from cyber threats, including routine data backups
  • Oversee and orchestrate an annual giving campaign developed in consultation with the Executive Director and board
  • Populate and maintain donor and fundraising database (with support from Manager of Operations)
  • Identify and cultivate new prospective donors and manage relationships with existing donors
  • Assist Executive Director with proposal development and engagement of potential funders and regional and national partners for program collaboration

PREFERRED SKILLS: Writing, web design, media relations, strategic communication, public speaking, research, citizen science and/or data collection, data management, social media, digital marketing, teamwork, supervisory, interpersonal, fundraising, and knowledge of environmental, public health, economic, agricultural, or other issues of relevance to understanding and addressing the implications of oil and gas extraction, petrochemicals, and climate change

MINIMUM EDUCATION/QUALIFICATIONS: Bachelor’s degree in communications, journalism, or related field preferred, but candidates with degrees in natural or physical sciences, environmental studies, citizen science, public health, public policy or other relevant fields will be considered. Master’s degree preferred but not required. Five years of work experience exercising the skills listed above; Ability and willingness to travel; Valid driver’s license.

LOCATION: Pittsburgh, PA or Harrisburg, PA

STATUS: Full time (37.5 hours per week) – exempt

CANDIDATES ARE ASKED TO SUBMIT SALARY REQUIREMENTS IN THEIR COVER LETTER


Application Process

Manager of Communications and Development candidates can apply online below. Clarifying questions about the application process can be submitted to Brook Lenker via email: lenker@fractracker.org.

Application period closes March 22, 2019 – 5:00 PM EST.

The FracTracker Alliance is an equal opportunity employer. All decisions regarding recruiting, hiring, promotion, assignment, training, termination, and other terms and conditions of employment are made without unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, religion, age, pregnancy, disability, work-related injury, covered veteran status, political ideology, genetic information, marital status, or any other factor that the law protects from employment discrimination.


Online Application

For Persevere Post

Please give to FracTracker Alliance in 2018

Fracking has made a real mess of things – sullying our air, befouling our water, disrupting communities. Ethane and other hydrocarbons feed plastic production, accelerating the global plastic pollution crisis while the planet warms out of control.

It’s an all-hands-on-deck moment.

Last week I traveled to Wyalusing, Pennsylvania, a quiet town along the Susquehanna, the mother river to the treasured Chesapeake Bay. Around Wyalusing, fracking consumes the landscape, and a planned 265-acre natural gas liquefaction complex promises more madness: around the clock trucking of volatile cargoes. Imagine watching a field behind your home morph into a sprawling industrial site with hazardous emissions. That story is real. Enough is enough – we need your help.

FracTracker works to illuminate the incursions of this rogue industry. Our maps, data, and analyses support the mounting pushback on infrastructure – from sand mines to pipelines, production wells to waste injection wells. The spectrum of harms is daunting, but our team is motivated to highlight risk and injustice wherever they arise, giving the public the tools and information they need in these David vs. Goliath battles.

Wyalusing is a Native American word meaning “home of the warrior.” Like the people standing their ground in that place today or the army of organizations across America with whom we collaborate, we’re all warriors fighting for a healthy future near and far.

Please give to FracTracker this holiday season. Your donation offers us hope and strength, powering actions that aid, inspire, and facilitate victory. It’s a gift that keeps on giving.

FracTracker will soon eclipse one million unique visitors to our website, underscoring that we are and shall remain a valued resource for advocacy, education, and research until the glorious day fossil fuels fade into history. Until then, on behalf of our staff and board, thank you for your ongoing support and warm wishes for a safe and joyous holiday season.

Appreciatively,

Brook Lenker
Executive Director

 

The proposed route for the Delmarva Pipeline. Map courtesy of FracTracker Alliance.

The Proposed Delmarva Pipeline: Environmental or economic justice concern?

A new plan is in the works to construct a natural gas pipeline that would run approximately 190 miles through Maryland. Lawmakers said in January they are anxious to see the Delmarva Pipeline built, but still want to exercise caution.

Starting in Cecil County, MD, and terminating in Accomack County, VA, the proposed Delmarva Pipeline is nearly the length of Maryland’s Eastern Shore. North Carolina-based Spectrum Energy wants to piggyback on this infrastructure and build a gas-powered power plant near Denton, MD, according to a report by WBOC 16 News. The combined price tag on the two projects is $1.25 billion, and is funded entirely by private interests based in Baltimore. The target start-up date for the two projects is 2021.

Local Support

Company officials promise the pipeline would bring down energy costs and bring jobs to the area. According to a 2016 Towson University study, the project would create about 100 jobs in Wicomico and Somerset Counties by 2026. In addition, the proposed power plant in Denton, MD would result in 350 construction jobs and 25-30 permanent jobs.

According to lawmaker Carl Anderton:

…it’s great. You know, anytime we can multiply our infrastructure for energy production, it’s something you really want.

Anderton, who claims to also support solar power and offshore wind, is skeptical about the sustainability of renewable energy to stand on its own if “the sun goes down or the wind’s not blowing.”

However, Senator Stephen Hershey emphasized the need to balance infrastructure build-out with costs to the environment. Said Hershey:

We have to make sure we’re taking all the possible steps to protect that.

Similarly, Democratic Delegate Sheree Sample-Hughes indicated the need to keep the well-being and concerns of citizens “at the forefront.”

Grassroots Opposition

The pipeline project has encountered considerable opposition from the grassroots group “No! Eastern Shore Pipeline.” The group has cited concerns about how all fossil fuels add to global warming, and asserted natural gas is not a cleaner alternative to propane or oil.

In fact, current research indicates that as a driver of climate change, methane (natural gas) is up to 100 times more powerful at trapping heat than is CO2 (See also “Compendium of Scientific, Medical, and Media Findings Demonstrating Risks and Harms of Fracking,” p. 21, “Natural gas is a threat to the climate”).

Jake Burdett, a supporter of No! Eastern Shore Pipeline, wants a complete transition to renewable fuels in Maryland by 2035, and argues that in the near-term, climate change impacts will be devastating and not reversible for residents of the Chesapeake Bay area, “the third most at-risk area in the entire country for sea level rise.”

In addition to driving climate change, hydraulic fracturing and the construction of the pipeline along the rural and historic Eastern Shore poses serious threats of fouling ground and surface water through sediment run-off and leaks. The possibility of pipeline explosions also puts nearby communities at risk.

Assessing Risks

H4 Capital Partners, the company contracted to build the pipeline, registered as a corporation in May of 2017, and this may be the first pipeline project it has undertaken. H4’s public relations spokesperson Jerry Sanders claimed that the environmental risks posed by the pipeline — which will drill under rivers and wetlands — will be nothing like those encountered by pipelines such as the Keystone XL. Said Sanders, “It is a gas, not a liquid…[so] you don’t have leak-type issues.”

The actual record about pipeline leaks and explosions suggests otherwise, notably summarized here by FracTracker Alliance in 2016, for combined oil and natural gas projects. That research indicates that since 2010, there have been 4,215 pipeline incidents resulting in 100 reported fatalities, 470 injuries, and property damage exceeding $3.4 billion. Additional records of natural gas transmission and distribution pipeline accidents, and hazardous liquid pipeline accidents collected by PHMSA (Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration) have been summarized by the Pipeline Safety Trust.

It is unclear whether Maryland’s Department of the Environment (MDE) has completed an analysis of threats to wetlands and other water bodies, or is relying on industry and perhaps residents to do that work for them. Said MDE spokesperson Jay Apperson, “MDE would encourage the project proponents to come in early and often for discussions of routes so that we can… avoid and minimize impacts to these important natural resources.”

Delmarva Pipeline Map

Therefore, in the map below, we have done an analysis of the Delmarva Pipeline route – which we estimated from documents – and calculated the number of times the proposed pipeline crosses wetlands and streams along its route from northern Maryland to its terminus in Accomack County, VA.

View map fullscreen | How FracTracker maps work

Delmarva Pipeline: Wetland and Stream Crossings

In all, there were 172 stream crossings and 579 traverses of wetlands mapped by the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Wetland Inventory. Be sure to zoom in on the map above to view the detail. These wetland and stream crossings included:

in Virginia:

  • 88 forested wetlands
  • 13 emergent wetlands
  • 27 riverine wetlands
  • 9 ponds

And in Maryland:

  • 276 forested wetlands
  • 90 riverine wetlands
  • 35 emergent wetlands
  • 13 estuarine wetlands
  • 11 ponds
  • 5 lakes

Rather than focusing on threats to these natural resources or environmental justice issues associated with the nearly 200-mile pipeline, industry is utilizing a different tactic, preferring to view the project as an “economic justice issue [that] would allow the area to have access to low-cost fuels.”

For the Eastern Shore residents of Maryland and Virginia, it remains to be seen whether potential lower energy costs justify the risks of contaminated waterways, property damage, and a shifting shoreline associated with climate change driven by use of fossil fuels.


By Karen Edelstein, Eastern Program Coordinator, FracTracker Alliance